Beyond the Size

Potting and Growing Hydrangeas: Best Practices and Tips

Hydrangeas are beautiful flowering plants that are popular with gardeners all over the world. These plants are easy to grow and care for, but they require some special considerations when it comes to potting and growing them.

In this article, we will discuss the best practices for potting and growing hydrangeas to ensure that they thrive in your garden.

Potting Hydrangeas

Choosing the Right Plant for Re-Potting

When it comes to potting hydrangeas, it is important to choose the right type of plant for re-potting. Dwarf hydrangeas are a popular choice because they are small, compact, and easy to care for.

Additionally, look for a plant with healthy leaves which can indicate that the plant is in good health.

Planning to Size Up

If you are planning to size up your hydrangeas, consider using a half-whiskey barrel planter. This will give your plant plenty of room to grow, but make sure to check that the barrel planter has a drain hole and weep holes for better drainage.

Fill the bottom of the barrel planter with gravel before adding potting soil mixed with organic matter to help the plant to thrive.

Watering: Scheduling Regular Checks

Regular watering is crucial to the health of hydrangeas. Make sure that your plant has good drainage as they do not like to sit in water.

Also, note that vining varieties of hydrangeas require more water than bushy ones. Check the top inch of potting soil regularly to see if your plant needs watering, but avoid overwatering as it can lead to root rot.

Lastly, also ensure that you are not under-watering.

Avoiding Over-Crowding

Take care to avoid over-crowding your hydrangeas, as plants in physical contact with each other may cause problems such as disease or insect infestations. To prevent this, ensure that there is enough space between each plant.

If necessary, consider pruning back the plant to create more space.

Sunlight

Hydrangeas prefer the morning sun and afternoon shade. Therefore, it is best to plant them in an eastern garden or in an area that is shaded by a tree canopy.

Doing so will not only help the plant thrive, but also provides a beautiful decorative feature in the garden.

Rolling Planters

Consider using rolling platforms for your hydrangea pots, especially if they are heavy. Opt for a rolling platform with good quality casters that can bear the weight of both the pot, soil, gravel, and the plant itself.

With a rolling planter, you can easily rearrange your plants to suit your desired settings.

Growing Hydrangeas

Acidic Soil for Blue Flowers

If you want your hydrangeas to produce blue flowers, you will need to plant them in acidic soil. This is because flower color in hydrangeas is determined by the pH level of the soil.

Test your soil’s pH level and adjust it accordingly by adding lime or sulfur to make it more acidic or alkaline respectively.

Fertilizing for Color

To promote specific colors in your hydrangea blooms, you will need to fertilize them with acidic or alkaline nutrients. For example, adding aluminum sulfate to your soil can help to make blue flowers more vivid.

In contrast, adding lime or phosphorous will give pink or reddish blooms. Determine the ideal pH level for your specific color of bloom and fertilize accordingly to help your plant produce the desired bloom.

Pruning

To keep your hydrangeas bushy, start pruning them during the second year of growth. Cut back the plant by 1/3, trimming off any dead or weak branches.

Note that certain varieties of hydrangeas require different pruning methods, so make sure to research your variety beforehand. Lastly, be aware that pruning too much will reduce or eliminate next year’s flowers.

Temperature

Hydrangeas thrive in the temperature forests of Asia, which means that they prefer cooler temperatures. To ensure that your hydrangeas do not burn up during the summer months, plant them in an area that is shaded from the afternoon sun.

In other words, the plant should receive sunlight during the morning hours, but be shaded in the afternoon.

Location

When choosing a location for your hydrangeas, consider an eastern garden that receives morning sun and afternoon shade. Additionally, hydrangeas grow well under the canopy of a tree because they like slightly acidic soil.

Trees also provide protection against strong sunlight during the hottest months of the year. In conclusion, hydrangeas are beautiful plants that can add a colorful touch to your garden.

By following the best practices for potting and growing hydrangeas, you can ensure that your plant thrives in your garden. This guide provides all the necessary information to get started on growing them, from choosing the right plant to scheduling regular watering checks, ensuring your hydrangeas grow strong and healthy.

Maintaining Hydrangeas in Pots

Once your hydrangeas are potted, your job is not finished. Maintaining your plant is crucial if you want it to thrive in its new home.

In this section, we will discuss how to properly water, fertilize, prune, and move your plant for the best results.

Watering

Regular watering is critical for hydrangeas to develop strong and healthy roots. Keep the soil consistently moist, but avoid over-watering which can lead to root rot.

Check the top inch of potting soil regularly, if it’s drying out, its time to water, however, if the soil is still wet from a previous watering, it’s best to wait. Good drainage is also important if you want to avoid standing water.

Fertilizing

Fertilizing your hydrangeas can help promote healthy growth and vibrant blooms. Add acidic or alkaline nutrients, depending on the specific color of bloom that you desire.

Use fertilizers in accordance with the plant’s recommended schedule and follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully, taking care to not over-fertilize which can harm your plant.

Pruning

Regular pruning can help maintain the bushy appearance of your hydrangeas. Prune the plant during the second year of growth by cutting back the plant by one-third and trimming off any dead or weak branches.

Its essential to research your specific variety of hydrangea to determine the best pruning method. Over-pruning can reduce or eliminate the chances of future flowers, so be careful to avoid pruning too much.

Moving

If you want to move your hydrangea, it’s important to do it with care. Consider transferring your plant to a whiskey barrel planter for a long-term home.

Use a rolling platform fitted with quality casters to transport your plant. Fill the bottom of the barrel planter with gravel and soil mixed with plant matter to ensure its optimal condition.

Do not lift the planter by its handles, as they can easily break while moving a heavy plant.

Tips and Tricks

Potting Hydrangeas is Fun

Potting hydrangeas can be a fun and rewarding experience. Hydrangeas are one of the most popular flowering shrubs around, and their beautiful flowers can add a pop of color and elegance to your garden.

Starting Small

When it comes to potting hydrangeas, starting small is the key to success. Consider starting with a smaller pot and then transferring to a larger pot as the plant grows.

This approach will help you avoid over-crowding and give your plant plenty of room to grow.

Avoiding Stress

Stress can limit the growth of your flowering hydrangea. To prevent this, avoid stressing your plant with too much sun, over-fertilization, or over-pruning.

Ensure that the location of your plant has the right amount of shade and sun, the right soil acidity, and keep up with proper watering techniques.

Starting in a Quart-Sized Pot

A quart-sized pot is the perfect size for starting your hydrangea. Fill it with soil mixed with plant matter and water at the right intervals to ensure that the soil stays continuously moist but not over-saturated.

Watch the plant grow, make sure it gets enough sunlight, and when it’s ready, transfer it to a larger pot.

Forever Pot

Consider using a whiskey barrel planter for your hydrangeas as it provides enough room for growth and helps provide a healthy environment for your plant. The barrel planter is durable and aesthetic, making it a great investment that will last many years.

Avoiding Damage

To avoid damaging your hydrangea pot when moving it, consider using a stand or patio cover. You can also use a rolling platform with good wheels to prevent damage while moving.

Roll the pot slowly and carefully to prevent jarring and tipping, which can cause root damage or spills. Be sure not to jerk the planter suddenly with the soil and plant matter inside.

In conclusion, potting and growing hydrangeas is an enjoyable and rewarding experience that can add a burst of color and texture to your garden. Remember to choose the right plant for your re-potting needs, provide a balanced amount of water and fertilizer, be careful when pruning, avoid moving too often, and follow the tips and tricks mentioned in this article.

With these simple steps and following the guidelines provided in the FAQs, you can create a beautiful outdoor space with these stunning plants.

FAQs:

1.

What is the best soil for hydrangeas? Answer: Hydrangeas preferred slightly acidic soil (pH level between 5.2 to 6.0) with good drainage.

2. How often should I water my potted hydrangea?

Answer: Keep the soil consistently moist, but avoid over-watering which can lead to root rot. Check the top inch of potting soil regularly to see if your plant needs watering, and water if it’s drying out.

3. How do I prune my hydrangea?

Answer: Prune the plant during the second year of growth by cutting back the plant by one-third and trimming off any dead or weak branches. Research your specific variety of hydrangea to determine the best pruning method.

4. How often should I fertilize my hydrangea?

Answer: Follow the manufacturer’s instructions on the fertilizer product you use. It’s best to fertilize during the growing season at least once every two weeks.

5. Can I move my hydrangea once it’s potted?

Answer: Yes, you can move your hydrangea, but do it with care. Consider transferring your plant to a whiskey barrel planter for a long-term home.

Use a rolling platform fitted with quality casters to transport your plant, and avoid lifting the planter by its handles because they could break while moving a heavy plant.

Popular Posts