Beyond the Size

World’s Longest Oil Pipelines: Connecting Continents Fueling Nations

The world’s dependency on oil is unquestionable, but how does it get from the oil fields to the pump? Well, it gets there via some of the longest pipelines in the world.

These pipelines transport massive volumes of crude oil across countries and continents, with some even stretching across oceans. In this article, we will take a closer look at some of the longest oil pipelines in the world, their capacity, and the countries they connect.

Druzhba Pipeline:

The Druzhba pipeline, also known as the Friendship Pipeline, is the largest oil pipeline system in the world. It stretches from the Almetyevsk region in Russia to Schwedt in Germany, covering a distance of approximately 4,000 km.

The pipeline has 69 pumping stations, and its capacity is around 1.2 million barrels of oil per day. The pipeline is owned by Rosneft, and it has been in operation since 1964.

Eastern Siberia-Pacific Ocean Oil Pipeline:

The Eastern Siberia-Pacific Ocean Oil Pipeline is one of the longest pipelines in the world, running over 2,700 km and connecting the oil fields of eastern Russia to the Far East and China. Built and operated by Transneft, the pipeline has a capacity of 1.6 million barrels of oil per day.

It starts in Angarsk and passes through Daqing, Taishet, and Kozmino, before terminating in the Russian ports of Nakhodka and Vladivostok. The pipeline was completed in 2012 and is a collaboration between the Russian and Chinese governments and Surgutneftegas.

Keystone Oil Pipeline:

The Keystone Oil Pipeline is a system of pipelines that runs from Canada through the United States and down to the Gulf Coast. The system is owned by TC Energy, and it transports crude oil from the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin to refineries in Illinois, Texas, and Cushing, Oklahoma.

The pipeline has a capacity of 830,000 barrels of oil per day and measures approximately 4,324 km in length. The controversial XL phase of the pipeline was cancelled by President Biden early in his tenure due to environmental concerns.

Kazakhstan-China Pipeline:

The Kazakhstan-China Pipeline is a pipeline that stretches over 2,220 km, connecting the western Kazakhstan oil fields to Xinjiang in China. The pipeline has a capacity of 1.4 million barrels of oil per day and transports crude oil from the Aktobe region, Kumkol field, and Kashagan field.

The pipeline also crosses into Russia and passes through the Caspian Sea. The pipeline was built in two phases and is owned by China National Petroleum Corporation as part of a wider project to transport gas from Central Asia.

Tazama Oil Pipeline:

The Tazama Oil Pipeline is a pipeline that runs from Tanzania to Zambia, transporting crude oil from the Indeni Petroleum Refinery in Zambia back to Tanzania. The pipeline spans 1,710 km and has a capacity of 50,000 barrels of oil per day.

The pipeline has seven pumping stations, and it transports oil to the Dar-es-Salaam port for export. The pipeline was constructed in the 1960s and is jointly owned by the governments of Zambia and Tanzania.

East-West Crude Oil Pipeline:

The East-West Crude Oil Pipeline is a pipeline that runs from Abqaiq in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia to the Red Sea port of Yanbu. The pipeline measures over 1,200 km in length and has a capacity of 5 million barrels of oil per day.

The pipeline was built during the Iran-Iraq war to transport crude oil from eastern Saudi Arabia to the western coast for export. The pipeline can also transport natural gas liquids and has been instrumental in Saudi Arabia’s oil exports.

Niger-Benin Oil Pipeline:

The Niger-Benin Oil Pipeline is a pipeline that stretches from the Agadem basin in Niger to Port Seme in Benin. The pipeline spans approximately 1,980 km and has a capacity of 90,000 barrels of oil per day.

The pipeline was constructed by the China National Petroleum Corporation in partnership with the governments of Niger and Benin. The pipeline terminates at an offshore terminal near Cotonou, where crude oil is loaded onto tankers for export.

Capline Reversal Oil Pipeline:

The Capline Reversal Oil Pipeline is a pipeline system that runs from Illinois to Louisiana in the United States. The pipeline was initially built to transport crude oil from the Gulf Coast to the Midwest, but it was eventually reversed to transport crude oil to the Gulf Coast.

The pipeline measures approximately 1,275 km in length and has a capacity of 1.2 million barrels of oil per day. The pipeline is jointly owned by Marathon Pipe Line, Plains All American Pipeline, and BP.

Conclusion:

Oil pipelines are the backbone of the petroleum industry, connecting oil fields to refineries and ports for export. The pipelines range from a few hundred kilometers to over 4,000 km in length, and they have the capacity to transport millions of barrels of crude oil every day.

The pipelines are owned and operated by governments and private companies, and they have been instrumental in meeting the world’s growing demand for oil. With new pipeline projects being launched regularly, it is only a matter of time before the world’s longest oil pipeline changes, and we continue to witness this ever-evolving industry.

In conclusion, the world’s longest oil pipelines are essential to the petroleum industry and have been instrumental in meeting the growing demand for oil. From the Druzhba Pipeline to the Capline Reversal Oil Pipeline, each pipeline system connects oil fields to refineries and ports for export, spanning countries and continents.

The increased investment in pipeline projects has brought new challenges, but they remain a crucial means of meeting our energy needs. Check out some of the commonly asked questions below to learn more about these important pipelines.

FAQs:

1. How are pipelines monitored?

Pipelines are monitored 24/7 using technology such as sensors, cameras, and aerial surveys for timely detection and resolution of any potential issues before they escalate. 2.

What are the environmental concerns associated with pipelines? The construction of the pipelines, spills, and leaks during transportation, and pipeline abandonment or decommissioning can pose environmental risks to soil, air, and water quality.

3. What is the impact of pipelines on Indigenous communities?

Pipelines have been known to encroach on Indigenous lands, disrupting their cultural practices and sacred sites, and impacting their quality of life. 4.

Is pipeline transportation safer than other modes of transportation? While pipeline transportation does have a lower risk of accidents and spills than other modes of transportation, they are still susceptible to mechanical failure, human error, and natural disasters.

5. How do pipeline projects affect local economies?

Pipeline construction and operation can have a significant economic impact on local communities, providing jobs and revenue for local businesses and governments. However, the long-term sustainability of this impact is subject to a myriad of factors, including global market prices and demand.

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